The tendency towards complexity and the ultimate complexity of God

Sometimes, when we don’t believe in ourselves we need something else to believe in, which is probably where God came from. Before we were able to explore the universe in as much detail as we are today, there were things that were unexplainable. To cope with this fear of the unknown our human brains created God.

I can image that early life on earth would have been fascinated by night and day, the sun and the moon. To our prehistoric ancestors these would have been things of great significance and so they would have been given great meaning, great importance and great power. In the absence of any rational and logical explanations for ‘life’ and any scientific proof to the contrary, a simple explanation for the unexplainable would to be put them down to some form of higher power, divine being or God.

I’m a deeply spiritual person but I have no time for our old, organised religions or any new ones for that matter. Religion has outlived its usefulness. I could spend a huge amount of time and energy arguing the point, but fortunately OSHO has already done this very well in his book ‘The Book of Understanding’. If you are doubtful over organised religions but need religiousness in your life, I highly recommend you read OSHO’s text.

There is one problem with disbanding religion and our religious beliefs and that is that it leaves a gap in our psyche. We are beings that look for meaning in our lives. When we can’t find or don’t understand what is happening to us we have previously used God as the catch all explanation for everything. Handing our will and thus our responsibility over to God is very dangerous though, because it absolves us from doing bad things. I’m not making this stuff up, you simple have to research the number one reason throughout human for war. It is religion. Sane men have done insane things in the name of religion.

As evolved and enlightened beings we need to accept responsibility for our actions. We have a choice. We always have a choice. The good thing about religions is that they generally act as a moral and social guidebook for people who need guidance. If you take that away we can feel lost and overwhelmed because sometimes the consequences of our actions can have long and far reaching effects.

So where does one turn to when you wake up from religion and realise that you are on your own? You are solely responsible for you, for your choices and for your actions. In many ways the military is very similar to religion. You are expected to follow the chain of command and do as you are ordered to do without question. Somehow this justifies killing in the same way that killing in the name of God has justified killing in countless wars throughout our history.

This is where I have come to understand ‘The path to ultimate complexity’.

For me, science is a step forward from religion, as it encourages impartial observation. It encourages the study of events. It tries to uncover facts. Science is however, not a religion, even though some of us seem to have adopted it as such. We place our blind faith once more in something that explains the unexplainable. What science doesn’t give us is moral guidance. It can explain what happens but it doesn’t place any justification on these events. As I said, science is impartial.

So here’s my take on the state of the world at the moment.

Some of us have decided to leave religion behind. There is nothing right or wrong in doing so, it’s simply a choice and we are all free to make our own choices.

Some of us continue to believe in religion and/or one or many Gods. Again there is nothing wrong with this. If some people need spiritual guidance and they get what they need from religion then that is their prerogative.

It does appear though that there is an ever increasing gap between the non-religious and the religious and that this gap is creating fear and hatred on both sides.

This is where I hope that ‘The path to ultimate complexity’ will eventually enlighten us all.

I’m agnostic. I’m open to knowing God, I just can’t believe in God. I can only accept what I know and I only know what I can prove and for me proof comes from my own experiences. So where does the moral guidance come from?

If you think about it, since the dawn of the universe, the universe has been on a journey of ever increasing complexity. If there was indeed a big bang, what has come since then is the formation or matter, planets, stars, galaxies and now life. Ever increasingly complex things.

That is what is so fascinating for me about life on planet earth. Life is the most complex thing that we know of in the entire universe. If the purpose of the universe is to ultimately become more and more complex, can’t we develop a moral code based on that preface?

If we could, I believe it would act as a universal moral code for what we deem to be good and evil, right and wrong. Imagine, for a second, a universally accepted guidebook on how we should treat ourselves, each other and everything in the universe. There would be no more arguing or killing over who is right and who is wrong. No more need to prove which ideology is the true belief, there would just be universal acceptance.

As an introduction and at a very basic level here is how it would work.

A choice or action that prevented the universe from progressing to the next stage of complexity would be deemed as wrong or a bad thing, because it is not in the universes, and thus our own, best interest.

A choice or action that aided the universe on its path to ultimate complexity would be deemed as right or a good thing because ultimately the more complex and aware the universe becomes the closer it gets to becoming God.

Note: The path to ultimate complexity is also commonly known as ‘the tendency towards complexity’.

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